Putting PowerPoint text in a perfect circle

I am revamping my own introduction presentation and needed to align text according to a circle. Untill now, I used to improvise to fit text in a circle. There is a clean and simple way to do this. Click on the image for a bigger picture.

17 comments:

Alessandra said...

Jan, I can always learn a trick or two by following your blog. Thank you

Jan Schultink said...

My pleasure.

Stephen Yang said...

Thanks Jan. Looks really cool. Is there a way to do this in Office 2003?

Jan Schultink said...

I don't know of any Stephen...

Anonymous said...

Please help to try to do this on an imac. doesn't seem to work with their powerpoint

Jan Schultink said...

@Anonymous, unfortunately this a a bit hard for me. My main expertise is in Windows.

Anonymous said...

Thanks Jan

Anonymous said...

Same here. I'm trying to do this in PowerPoint 2008 on the Mac and I don't see the transform/follow path/circle options. Any ideas, anyone?

Sander said...

On a Mac (ppt 2008) I found the same option (via help) through the Toolbox / Formatting palette. There in 'Quick styles and effects' click the ABC button.

Then continue with Jan's instructions.

Jan: Bedankt / Toda raba

Richard Chen said...

Thanks to you (blogowner) and Sander.

Anonymous said...

Thanks a lot...it helped me, though I struggled a bit initially owing to my OS but it worked. :)

Cristiano Pereira Alves said...

Hi!

Thanks for all your tips.
Really nice this one.

Best regards,
Cristiano

August Mohr said...

Nice technique/trick. Thanks.

However, the typographer in me cannot help noticing slightly different minor glitches in the two examples.

I the plain demo, step 3, there is an extra space before "strategy". In the version with the moon phases, that larger space has been matched all the way around except right after "execution".

This is a tiny nit, and does not affect your point or your demo, so I feel I owe you an explanation for why I am pointing it out.

I worked for many years for an award winning designer (awards for rock album covers to computer advertisements) who used to nit-pick my work like this. Finally some things he had said clicked in:

When we first look at an image, our non-verbal brain is ahead, seeing the shapes and relationships. Only after the parts have been found can our verbal brain start reading the words, and we necessarily read them in the context of the parts we have already found.

In the circle, part of the intended meaning is the endless flow. When the spacing is different, our non-verbal brain finds a start/end-point before we have even begun to read the words and we will read the words in that context. We can't help it. And it changes the intended meaning.

I'm sure you have seen this effect in many places where the design has spacing, rules, sizes, fonts, etc. that give you a first impression of how it is organized that turns out not to match the actual organization. It is awkward and uncomfortable and in the worst cases you have to constantly fight the design while you are reading to keep the organization in your head when the design keeps telling you something else.

In this case, it is not that bad, but it does glitch because it inserts that start/end-point that is unintended.

I hope this helps,
August

Mike said...

Nice - thanks for posting

Katharina said...

thanks so much for the tip - it has been super useful! Katharina

Naga said...

Super tip!!! I struggled for more than an hour till I read your step by step approach. Thank you so much :)

Naga said...

Thank you so much for the tip. This was really useful ... I struggled for more than an hour using the standard F1 function on powerpoint :)